Courses Taught


Organismal Biology (BIOL 115)

(Taught Spring Semester)

Organismal Biology Syllabus Spring 2005

Click on this link to get the PDF Handouts
(Sorry, PDFs are not available)

Organismal Biology Review for Test #1 (on 9 February 2005)

PlantLabI.ppt

PlantLabQuestionsKey.doc

ReportSheet lab1 KEY organ2005.pdf

Plant Diversity Lab 2 Slide Show.pdf

Test 2 Review Sheet
 Organismal Biology
(Test # 2 moved to 7 March 2005)
(up to the spiders)

Pig Dissection Guide

Study Guide for Lab Test # 2 (1 April 2005, Friday)
(Mainly refer to sheets you received in lab- the question sheets and the "TO KNOW" lists pretty much list everything you need to know for this test.  If you are missing any of these sheets, there are extra copies in lab.)

Study Guide for Lecture Test 3 Organismal Biology
(Test # 3 is on the end on Chapter 33-start on Page 666 - and on ALL of Chapter 34)
Test Date Has Moved to 8 April 2005 (Friday)

 

 

Lab Test 3 - will be on Friday, 29 April - The study room next door is set up - pigs and models of brain, kidney, heart.  Also a few skulls, small mammals, example of sexual dimorphism are set up in the room to study.  The test will be mainly (about 80-85% or so) on the pig (see the lab sheets you already have) and the test on the models and things mentioned above that I have set out in the study room.

Poster Tips - how to cite the handouts, how to report the statistics.  See link.
Use the following format to cite your lab handouts for your experiments

 

Organismal Biology Study Guide for Test # 4 (4 MAY 2005 Wed)

Final Exam Study Guide - the entire study guide will be posted by Monday.  However, some of you want to start studying now.  Until I can write the entire study guide, start with knowing:

1.  main characteristics of each animal phylum
2.  main characteristics of each main plant group
(and be able to compare different animals with each other and different plant groups with each other)
3.  importance of the following (and which groups each occurs in): 
different kinds of symmetry, different kinds of coeloms, metamerism/segmentation
4.    main ideas about natural selection

Entire Study Guide for Final  

12 May 2005
(the final will be over the material listed in the "Entire Study Guide for Final" shown above)  

(TAKE NOTE:  I AM NOT retesting you over the Ecology and Animal Behavior Chapters (that is, Chapters 50, 51, 52, and 55)

Also -- Keys for Lecture Tests 1, 2, and 3 are posted on the Lab Door for Organismal.  (Test 4 is not there because I am not re-testing you over this material.)  Please DO NOT REMOVE from the door so others can look at them it they want to.

 

Lecture Notes For Organismal Biology (PowerPoint):

Organismal Biology/22A-HistorcalContextOfEvol.ppt

Organismal Biology/22B1-DarwinianRevolution.ppt

Organismal Biology/22B2-DarwinianRevolution.ppt

Organismal Biology/23A-PopulationGenetics.ppt

Organismal Biology/23B-CausesOfMicroevolution-1.ppt

Organismal Biology/23C-GeneticVariation-1.ppt

Organismal Biology/23D-ClosrLookNaturalSelect-2.ppt

Organismal Biology/24A-WhatIsASpecies.ppt

Organismal Biology/24B-ModesOfSpeciation.ppt

Organismal Biology/24C-SpeciatnToMacroevolutn.ppt

Organismal Biology/25A1-FosilRecrdGeologicTime.ppt

Organismal Biology/25A2-FosilRecrdGeologicTime.ppt

Organismal Biology/25B1-Systematics.ppt

Organismal Biology/25B2-Systematics.ppt

Organismal Biology/26A-IntroToHistoryOfLife.ppt

Organismal Biology/26B-TheOriginOfLife.ppt

Organismal Biology/26C-MajorLineagesOfLife.ppt

Organismal Biology/27A-WorldOfProkaryotes.ppt

Organismal Biology/27B1-StrctrFnctinReproProka.ppt

Organismal Biology/27B2-StrctrFnctinReproProka.ppt

Organismal Biology/27C-NutriAndMetablicDivers.ppt

Organismal Biology/27D-ProkaryDiversitySurvey.ppt

Organismal Biology/27E-ProkryEcologicalImpact.ppt

Organismal Biology/28A-IntroductionToProtists.ppt

Organismal Biology/28B-OriginAndEarlyDivrsity.ppt

Organismal Biology/28C1-SampleProtistanDivrst.ppt

Organismal Biology/28C2-SampleProtistanDivrst.ppt

Organismal Biology/29A-OvrviewLandPlantEvolut.ppt

Organismal Biology/29B-OriginOfLandPlants.ppt

Organismal Biology/29C1-Bryophytes.ppt

Organismal Biology/29C2-Bryophytes.ppt

Organismal Biology/29D-OriginOfVascularPlants.ppt

Organismal Biology/29E-Pteridophytes.ppt

Organismal Biology/30A-OvrvwSeedPlantEvolutn.ppt

Organismal Biology/30B1-Gymnosperms.ppt

Organismal Biology/30B2-Gymnosperms.ppt

Organismal Biology/30C1-Angiosperms.ppt

Organismal Biology/30C2-Angiosperms.ppt

Organismal Biology/30D-Plants&HumanWelfare.ppt

Organismal Biology/31A-IntrodutionToTheFungi.ppt

Organismal Biology/31B1-DiversityOfFungi.ppt

Organismal Biology/31B2a-DiversityOfFungi.ppt

Organismal Biology/31B3-DiversityOfFungi.ppt

Organismal Biology/31C-EcologiclImpactOfFungi.ppt

Organismal Biology/31D-EvolutionOfFungi.ppt

Organismal Biology/32A-WhatIsAnAnimal.ppt

Organismal Biology/32B-2ViewsOfAnimalDivrsity.ppt

Organismal Biology/32C-OrignsOfAnimalDivrsity.ppt

Organismal Biology/33A-Parazoa.ppt

Organismal Biology/33B-Radiata.ppt

Organismal Biology/33C1-ProtostomiaLophotrch.ppt

Organismal Biology/33C2-ProtostomiaLophotrchz.ppt

Organismal Biology/33C3-ProtostomiaLophotrchz.ppt

Organismal Biology/33D1-ProtostomiaEcdysozoa.ppt

Organismal Biology/33D2-ProtostomiaEcdysozoa.ppt

Organismal Biology/33D3-ProtostomiaEcdysozoa.ppt

Organismal Biology/33E-Deuterostomia.ppt

Organismal Biology/34A-InvtbChrdtsOrgnVrtbrts.ppt

Organismal Biology/34B-IntroToVertebrates.ppt

Organismal Biology/34C-JawlessVertebrates.ppt

Organismal Biology/34D-FishesAndAmphibians.ppt

Organismal Biology/34E1-Amniotes.ppt

Organismal Biology/34E2-Amniotes.ppt

Organismal Biology/34E3-Amniotes.ppt

Organismal Biology/34F-PrimtsEvoluOfHmoSapien.ppt

Organismal Biology/50A-ScopeOfEcology.ppt

Organismal Biology/50B1-FactrsDstrbuOfOrgansm.ppt

Organismal Biology/50B2-FactrsDstrbuOfOrgansm.ppt

Organismal Biology/50C1-AquatcAndTerstialBiom.ppt

Organismal Biology/50C2-AquatcAndTerstialBiom.ppt

Organismal Biology/50D-SpatialScaleDistribut.ppt

Organismal Biology/51A-IntroBehvrAndBehvrEco.ppt

Organismal Biology/51B-Learning.ppt

Organismal Biology/51C-AnimalCognition.ppt

Organismal Biology/51D1-SocalBehvrAndSociobio.ppt

Organismal Biology/51D2-SocalBehvrAndSociobio.ppt

Organismal Biology/52A-ChrctrstcsOfPopulaton.ppt

Organismal Biology/52B-LifeHistories.ppt

Organismal Biology/52C-PopulationGrowth.ppt

Organismal Biology/52D-PopultionLimtngFactrs.ppt

Organismal Biology/52E-HumanPopulationGrowth.ppt

Organismal Biology/55A1-BiodiversityCrisis.ppt

Organismal Biology/55A2-BiodiversityCrisis.ppt


THE LINKS BELOW FOR ORGANISMAL LECTURES NO LONGER WORK AS OF 1 MARCH 2012 - use above links instead

22A-HistoricalContextOfEvol.ppt

22B1-DarwinianRevolution.ppt

22B2-DarwinianRevolution.ppt

23A-PopulationGenetics.ppt

23B-CausesOfMacroevolution-1.ppt

23C-GeneticVariation-1.ppt

23D-ClosrLookNatural Select-2.ppt

24A-WhatIsASpecies.ppt

24B-ModesOfSpeciation.ppt

24C-SpeciatnToMacroevolutn.ppt

25A1-FosilRecrdGeologicTime.ppt

25A2-FosilRecrdGeologicTime.ppt

25B1-Systematics.ppt

25B2-Systematics.ppt
Note:  This section (25B2) will not be covered in class and you will not be tested on it.  It covers details that you will get in more advanced classes.  I am including it here in the event you want to read it (it follows your textbook).

26A-IntroToHistoryOfLife.ppt

26B-TheOriginOfLife.ppt

26C-MajorLineagesOfLife.ppt

27A-WorldOfProkaryotes.ppt

27B1-StrchFnctnReproProka.ppt

27B2-StrctrFnctnReproProka.ppt

27C-NutriAndMetabolicDivers.ppt

27D-ProkaryDiversitySurvey.ppt

27E-ProkaryEcoloicalImpact.ppt

28A-IntroductionToProtista.ppt

28B-OriginAndEarlyDivrsty.ppt
Note:  This section (28B) will not be covered in class and you will not be tested on it.  It covers details that you will get in more advanced classes.  I am including it here in the event you want to read it (it follows your textbook).

28C1-SampleProtistanDivrst.ppt

28C2-SampleProtistanDivrst.ppt

29A-OvrviewLand PlantEvolut.ppt

29B-OriginOfLanfPlants.ppt

29C1-Bryophytes.ppt

29C2-Bryophytes.ppt

29D-OriginOfVascularPlants.ppt

29E-Pteridophytes.ppt

30A-OvrvwSeedPlantEvolution.ppt

30B1-Gymnosperms.ppt

30B2-Gymnosperms.ppt

30C1-Angiosperms.ppt

30C2-Angiosperms.ppt

30D-Plants&HumanWelfare.ppt

31A-IntroductionToTheFungi.ppt

31B1-DiversityOfFungi.ppt

31B2a-DiversityOfFungi.ppt

31B3-DiversityOfFungi.ppt

31C-EcologicalImpactOfFungi.ppt

31D-EvolutionOfFungi.ppt

32A-WhatIsAnAnimal.ppt

32B-ViewsOfAnimalDiversity.ppt

32C-OriginsOfAnimal Diversity.ppt

33A-Parazoa.ppt

33B-Radiata.ppt

33C1-ProtostomiaLophotrch.ppt

33C2-ProtostomiaLophotrch.ppt

33C3-ProtostomiaLophotrch.ppt

33D1-ProtostomiaEcdysozoa.ppt

33D2-ProtostomiaEcdysozoa.ppt

33D3-ProtostomiaEcdysozoa.ppt

33E-Deuterostomia.ppt

34A-InvtbChrdtsOrgnVrt.ppt

34B-IntroToVertebrates.ppt

34C-JawlessVeetebrates.ppt

34D-FishesAndAmphibians.ppt

34E1-Amniotes.ppt

34E2-Amniotes.ppt

34E3-Amniotes.ppt

34F-PrimtsEvoluOfHmoSapien.ppt

50A-ScopeofEcology.ppt

50B1-FactsDstrbuOfOrgansm.ppt

50B2-FactrsDstrbuOfOrgansm.ppt

50C1-AquaticAndTerstialBiom.ppt

50C2-AquaticAndTerstialBiom.ppt

50D-SpatialScaleDistribut.ppt

N51A-IntroBehavAndEco.ppt

51B-Learning.ppt

51C-AnimalCognition.ppt

51D1-SocialBehavAndSociobio.ppt

51D2-SocialBehavAndSociobio.ppt

52A-ChrctsOfPopulations.ppt

52B-LifeHistories.ppt

52C-PopulationGrowth.ppt

52D-PopulationLimitingFactors.ppt

52E-HumanPopulationGrowth.ppt

55A1-BiodiversityCrisis.ppt

55A2-BiodiversityCrisis

UM Home Page

Stockrahm's Home Page

Biology Home Page

 

***********

 

General Zoology (BIOL 303)

(Taught Spring Semester)
(This course will not exist in its present form after Spring 2004)

**********

Wildlife Ecology (BIOL 455)

(Taught Alternate Years Fall Semester)

**********

Cell Biology Labs (BIOL 111)

(Taught Fall Semester)

********************************************

Principles of Animal Behavior (BIOL 402)

(Taught Alternate Years Fall Semester - 2001)

Animal Behavior Syllabus

Animal Behavior Reading Assignments

Animal Behavior Addendum to Bibliography

Animal Behavior Observation Assignment

Ideas for Animal Behavior Research Projects

Animal Behavior Sparrow Observations

Animal Behavior Scavenger Hunt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


BIOL 402  -	Principles of Animal Behavior Syllabus	  Spring 2008        
Instructor:	Donna M. Bruns Stockrahm, Ph.D.
Department:	Biosciences
Office:	Hagen Hall 407S
Phone:		(218)  477-2576(Office)
		1-(218) 937-5280 (Home)
Email:		stockram@mnstate.edu
Website:	http://web.mnstate.edu/stockram
Office Hours:See office hours posted on my office door
Location:	Lecture & Lab held in Hagen Hall 410 and 408.
Course Description:
(3 credits, includes lab).  The genetic, ecological, evolutionary and 
physiological aspects of animal behavior including the historical 
background, kin selection, communication, aggression, navigation, and
reproductive behavior.  With lab.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 341, 345.
2, 1-hr lectures and 1, 3-to-4-hr lab per week).
Required Text:  Drickamer, Lee C., Stephen H. Vessey, and 
		    Elizabeth M. Jakob.  2002.  Animal Behavior:  
		   Mechanisms, Ecology, and Evolution. McGraw-Hill, 
		   New York.  422pp.  (5th Ed.)

Required Readings:	Are included on a separate list.  Students will also 
			choose some additional readings.
Prerequisites:	BIOL 341 (Genetics) and BIOL 345 
(Ecology/Evolution) or permission of instructor.  It is assumed you 
know the basic concepts of development and neural 
anatomy/physiology that are covered in general biology.
Class meets for 2, 1-hr lecture periods and 1, 3-to-4-hr lab/recitation/ 
field period per week (field trips might extend beyond 3 hours).  
The lab/recitation period will consist of lab exercises and oral 
presentations/discussions on the readings as well as films 
demonstrating various concepts in animal behavior.  Most weeks, we 
will read papers relating to a particular topic and students will 
be responsible for giving a brief synopsis of each reading, then 
leading a class discussion.  We will have some field trips and 
opportunities for observing animal behavior and/or
gaining hands-on experience.  
Course Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes:
1)	To gain an understanding of the genetic, ecological, 
	evolutionary and physiological aspects of animal behavior.
2)	To gain an understanding of the historical background to the 
	study of animal behavior, as well as selected topics such 
	as kin selection, communication, aggression, navigation, 
	social behavior, and reproductive behavior.
3)	To gain hands-on experience in animal observation.

4)	To gain experience in critically analyzing literature
	in the field of animal behavior.
Attendance Policy:
See MSUM Student Handbook for Student Absence Policy:
http://web.mnstate.edu/sthandbook/POLICY/index.htm
Class attendance is expected, and lab attendance is mandatory as
it is nearly impossible to make up a lab.  Oral participation and 
reading all of the assigned papers are mandatory.
Course Requirements:
1.	Notebook:  Students will keep a detailed notebook on all lab 
	exercises, readings, films, and field trips.  Data 
	from your independent research project should also 
	be kept here. (This is separate and in	addition 
	to your "lecture notes" notebook.)
2.	Project--  You have several options for your project:

	A. 	RESEARCH PROJECT:
Project should be set up preferably as an experiment testing a 
hypothesis.  In special cases, an observational study might be 
permitted.  Project must include at least 10 hr of 
observational data. A research paper of the project will be 
written in standard scientific format including introduction, 
materials and methods, results, discussion, and literature 
cited (with a minimum of 10 references, preferably from the 
primary literature, not just from the WEB).  Students will give 
in-class, oral presentations on their research.  Students may work in 
pairs if they wish, but each person must contribute equally to the 
project and be able to demonstrate evidence of this equal 
partnership.			
	B. 	RESEARCH PROPOSAL:
Proposal should be written in the correct professional format for 
the funding agency to which you would submit the proposal.  You 
choose which funding agency to which you would want to submit the 
proposal (you do not really have to submit it).  Preferably the 
proposal should test a particular hypothesis.  Proposal must be a 
minimum of 15 pages long and, at a minimum, include:  1)  A brief 
description of proposed project (1 page - sort of like an 
abstract), 2)  Detailed description of project, 3)  Methods section 
which includes the experimental design as well as the statistical 
methods you plan to use to test the hypothesis (including all 
appropriate references), 4)  objectives, 5)  Future research plans, 
6)  Detailed literature review of the topic which must include a 
minimum of 20 references from the primary literature (this means 
from scientific journals;  you can have additional references from 
the WEB, but not in place of the 20 journal articles).
 
C.	TEST OF A HYPOTHESIS USING A LITERATURE REVIEW:
For this project, the student will study the animal behavior 
literature and find a controversial topic.  You will then present 
the literature in such a fashion as to represent the various 
interpretations, presenting evidence to support and/or reject a 
particular hypothesis.  This paper will be more than just a 
literature review, however, because you will then interpret all the 
information and write how you interpret the information.  Which 
interpretation has the most merit?  Which hypothesis is more 
plausible?  Do you want to offer an alternative hypothesis?  You 
must back up your statements with proper citations of the 
literature and your logic.  You must cite a minimum of 20 references 
from the primary literature (this means from scientific journals;  
you can have additional references from the WEB, but not in place 
of the 20 journal articles).
	
3.	Oral Presentations:								

	Each student will give a minimum of 3 in-class, oral		
	presentations on the readings (number of readings will depend on 
	number	of students in the class).  Student will give a 		
	brief synopsis of paper then he/she will lead the class 	
	in a discussion on the paper.			
4.	Exams:	
	Four exams will incorporate information from 		
	lectures, films, oral presentations, labs, 
	and readings.
	
Evaluation Standards/Course Grading Policy:
Grading:Exam 1...........100 points		A.....90-100%
	  Exam 2...........100 points		B.....80-89
	  Exam 3...........100 points		C.....70-79
	  Final........... 125 points		D.....60-69
	  Presentations......5 points 		F.....below 60
	  Lab Write-Ups ....25 points
	  Notebook..........25 points
	  Research Project.100 points
												-3-
Presentations & Notebook are mandatory for receiving credit for the 
course.
The required readings will be on reserve in the Ecology Dry Lab (Hagen 410). 
Papers must be read there and are not to be taken out of the room (only exception 
is if you quickly photocopy the article and return it).  Additional readings will be added as the
course progresses allowing us to look at some of the latest literature.
Lectures and lab/recitations will be integrated as much as 
possible.  The topics covered are listed below.  Some additional 
readings will be added. Movies will be shown during some labs.  
Lab sequence might change depending on weather and/or availability 
of animals.          

Course Outline:
WEEK	TOPIC				REQUIRED READINGS (*)
(Date refers to the Monday of that week)
1	LECTURE
(7 Jan)- Introduction			*Text - Ch. 1, 2
	- Historical Background       
	LAB
	- NO LAB THIS WEEK
2	LECTURE
(14 Jan)- Approaches and Methods      	*Text - Ch. 3	                  	
	- Genes and Evolution		*Text - Ch. 4
	LAB
	- Introduction to lab, lab/field notebooks
	- Scavenger Hunt
	- Cricket Lab (Ethograms)(Part 1)
	- Movie (time permitting)
3	LECTURE
(21 Jan)- Behavioral Genetics		*Text - Ch. 5
	- Evolution of Behavior     	*Text - Ch. 6		  	
	  Patterns	
	LAB (Martin Luther King Day - no lab)
	- Ethogram Exercise on your own time - see directions
	
4	LECTURE
(28 Jan)- Exam 1
	- Social Behavior			*Text - Ch. 19
	LAB
	- Cricket Lab (Part 2)
	- Movie
5	LECTURE				   
(4 Feb)- Sociobiology			*Wilson (1980) - Ch.1,2,19
		
	LAB
	- Movie	
	- TBA - Habitat Selection (if animals available)

6	LECTURE
(11 Feb)- Communication	        	*Text - Ch. 12
		         
	LAB	
	- Field trip to local pet stores to observe animal
	  behavior (weather permitting)

7	LECTURE
(18 Feb)- Nervous System & Behavior 	*Text - Ch. 7 

	LAB 
	- Crayfish lab:  set-up, initial observations
	- Movie
	- Discussion on Readings 
8	LECTURE
(25 Feb)- Hormones & Behavior	  	*Text - Ch. 8
	- Exam 2

	LAB  
	- Crayfish lab (continued)
	- Movie
	- Discussion of readings

9	SPRING BREAK - NO CLASS
(3-7 Mar)
10	LECTURE
(10 Mar)- Development of Behavior   	*Text - Ch. 10
	LAB
	- Crayfish lab (finish)
	- Discussion of readings
	- Movie
11	LECTURE
(17 Mar)- Learning 				*Text - Ch. 11	

	LAB
	- Guest Speaker and Seeing-Eye Dog "Patton"
	(training dogs, seeing-eye dog program)
	- Movie

12	LECTURE 
(24 Mar)- Conflict				*Text - Ch. 16
	LAB
	- Field Trip (MSUM Science Center) - Competitive
	  Behavior of Birds at Feeders
13	LECTURE
(31 Mar)- Exam 3
	- Biological Rhythms		*Text - Ch. 9
	LAB		
	- Computer Simulation Lab on Animal Behavior (Permitting
	  we can get the software); alternative lab - Fish Behavior
	- Discussion on Readings 

14	LECTURE
(7 Apr)- Sexual Reproduction 		*Text - Ch. 17
	  & Parental Care			   

	LAB
	- Field Trip:  Red River Valley Zoo 
	  (Weather permitting)
15	LECTURE
(14 Apr)- Mating Systems 			*Text - Ch. 18	
	  & Parental Care
	- Migration, Orientation,   	*Text - Ch. 13	
	  & Navigation			 

	LAB
	- Human Mating Choice Using Want Ads - Lab
	  Exercise
	- Discussion on Readings
16	LECTURE
(21 Apr)- Habitat Selection		*Text - Ch. 14	
	- Foraging Behavior	   		*Text - Ch. 15
	LAB
	- Foraging Lab
	- Discussion on Readings
	- Movie
17  	LECTURE
(28 Apr)- Catch Up
	LAB
	- Student oral presentations of projects
Final Exam:  TBA
*****************************************************

ACADEMIC HONESTY

See MSUM Student Handbook;
http://web.mnstate.edu/sthandbook/POLICY/index.htm

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS

From the Disabilities Office:  Student with disabilities who believe that they may need an accommodation in this class are encouraged to contact Greg Toutes, Coordinator of Disabilities Services, at 477-5859 (voice) or 1-800-627-3529 (MRS/TTY), CMU 114, as soon as possible to ensure that accommodations are implemented in a timely fashion.

 
UpDated by DMBS: 9 January 2008
*******************************************************************
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MSUM Home Page

Stockrahm's Home Page

Biology Home Page

 
 
Reading List/Discussion Topics will be distributed separately.

*******
Animal Behavior (BIOL 402)							
Paper Presentations and Discussions:	Updated 9 January 2008

(Some more papers will be added during the course)
"*" designates required reading
DISCUSSION 1:	   
		- Basic Concepts  		   * Harlow (1959)
 		- Instinct        		   * Hess (1958) or (1959)
 						   * Tinbergen (1952)
						   * Moors (2003)NEW	
DISCUSSION 2:		   	   				
		- Infanticide			   * Hoogland (1982, 1985)	
		- Genetics        		     Maynard Smith (1964)
		- Kin Selection   		   * Moehlman (1979)
		- Altruism        		   * Power (1975)
		  	   		   	   * Tiffany-Castiglioni (2004)
						     (Parts I and II) NEW
					   
						     Wilson (1980) - Ch. 5
						   * Hamilton (1963)   		
				    			Brown & Brown (1981)
							Brown (1974)
							Eberhard (1972)
							Erlenmeyer-Kimling
									& Jarvik (1963)								Holmes & Sherman (1983)
							Mayr (1977)
							Meikle and Vessey (1981)
							Sherman (1977, 1981)
						     Wilson (1973)
							Trivers (1971)
							Hrdy (1974, 1976, 1977,	
									1979, 1981)
						   * Emlen et al. (1995)
DISCUSSION 3:			
		- Sociobiology	   		   
		- Social Behavior 		   * King (1959)
						   * Calhoun (1962)
						   * Getz and Carter (1996)NEW	
					 	   	Barash (1974)
						 	Bertram (1975)
							Schneirla and Piel (1948)
							Shaw (1962)
							Kleiman& Eisenberg (1973)
							Alexander (1974)								Axelrod & Hamilton (1981)
					   	   	Bekoff
							    (1974a,'74b,'74c,77)
							Caraco & Wolf (1975)  
         						Chadab&Rettenmeyer (1975)
							Emlen (1952)
							Bock (1980)
												-2-
DISCUSSION 4:						 	 
		- Communication   		   * Premack (1971)  
		       	     		     	  	Wilson (1980) - Ch. 8,9,10
				                   * Bekoff (1977)
						   * Holldobler (1971)
						   * Nieh (1999) NEW
				                 	Bronson (1971)
							Bullock (1973)
							Carlson & Copeland (1978)
							Crews & Greenberg (1981)
							Fouts (1973)
							Gardner & Gardner (1969)
							Kalmijn (1971)
							Marler (1957, 1967)
							Menzel (1971)
							Morris (1956)
							Payne & McVay (1971)
							Savage-Rumbaugh
								et al. (1980)
							Sebeok (1965)
						   * Provine (1996)
						   * Schwenk (1995)
						   * Holden (1994)
		- Aggression      		   * Guhl (1956)
		- Dominance 	   		   * Calhoun (1962)- see above
		- Hierarchies	   		   * Wilson (1975a)	
							Rowell (1974)	
							Meikle et al. (1984)
							Nice (1941)
							Maynard Smith & Price 	
								(1973)
     							Wilson (1980)- Ch.11,13	
DISCUSSION 5:		
		- Learning & 	   		   * Text - Ch. 9, 10
		  Motivation  			   * Cowley (1988)
						   * Bitterman (1965, 1975)
							Hailman (1969)
							Marler & Peters (1977, 	
								1981)
				  			Moltz (1965)
							Seligman (1970)
							Shettlesworth (1972)
							Lehrman (1953)
						   * Wasserman (1995) 
									
DISCUSSION 6: 
		- Sexual Behavior		   * Buss (1994)
		- Mating Systems  		     Hutchinson (1959)
						   * Daly & Wilson (1983) -
							Pages 301,308,309
						   * Hrdy (1986)
							Bateman (1948)
						   * Emlen & Oring (1977)
				  		   * Weisstein (1982)
						   * Abele & Gilchrist (1977)
						   * Quaid and Peck (2003)NEW
						     Burley (1979)
							Dewsbury (1972)-very long
							Wilson (1980)-Ch. 15, 	
								p.279
							Immelmann (1972)
							Orians (1969)
							Zeveloff & Boyce (1980)
							Skutch (1949)
							Meikle et al. (1984)
							Jenni (1974)
							Lack (1949)
							Amadon (1964)
							Daly (1978)
							Daly & Wilson (1983)								Greenwood (1980)
						   * Wright (1994)
						   * Borgia (1995)
						   * Davies (1995)	
					
DISCUSSION 7:	 
		- Biological  	   		   * Takahashi & Zatz (1982)
		  Timekeeping     		   * Palmer (1975)
							Aronson et al. (1994)
							Page (1994)
						   * Barinaga (1995)	
						   * Takahashi & Hoffman (1995)
						   (This list be revised)
DISCUSSION 8:			
		- Migration 	   		   * Keeton (1969, 1970, 
		- Orientation  				1971, 1974)
		- Navigation	   		   * Sauer (1958)
						   * Southern (1969, 1972)
						   * Emlen (1970, 1975)
						   * Seachrist (1994)
							Carr (1965)
							Barbour et al. (1966)
							Mueller & Emlen (1957)
							Walcott (1977)
							Walcott et al. (1979)
							Zahl (1963)
						   (This list will be revised)
DISCUSSION 9:
		- Primate Behavior	             Wilson (1980) - Ch. 25
						     Lawick-Goodall (1971)-skim
					           * Booth (1988)
						   * Gurvis (1990)NEW
							Terrace et al. (1979)
							Meikle et al. (1984)
							Meikle & Vessey (1981)
						        Menzel (1971)
						        Premack (1971)
							Savage-Rumbaugh et al. 
								(1980)
							Hrdy (1981, 1986)
						        Fouts (1973)
							Gardner & Gardner (1969)
							Buettner-Janusch (1966)
							Harlow et al. (1971)
					            * Stanford (1995)
						    * Achenbach (2004)NEW
		

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Animal Behavior - Reading List Addendum					
Add these papers to reading list:		Updated 9 January 2008
(We will also  update list addendum during the course.)
Aronson, B. D., K. A. Johnson, J. J. Loros, J. C. Dunlap.  1994.
	Negative feedback defining a circadian clock:  autoregulation 
	of the clock gene frequency.  Science 263:1578-1584.
Barinaga, M.  1995.  Shedding light on the ticking of internal 
	timekeepers.  Science 267:1091-1092.
Borgia, G.  1995.  Why do bowerbirds build bowers?  American 
	Scientist 83:542-547.
Buss, D. M.  1994.  The strategies of human mating.  American 
	Scientist 82:238-249.
Davies, N. B.  1995.  Backyard battle of the sexes.  Natural 
	History 4:68-73.
Emlen, S. T., P. H. Wrege, and N. J. Demong.  1995.  An 
	evolutionary perspective.  American Scientist 83:148-157.
Grier, J. W., and T. Burk.  1992.  Biology of animal behavior.  
	Mosby- Year Book, Inc., St. Louis.  890pp.  (2nd Edition).
Holden, C.  (ed.)  1994.  Vertebrate vibrations.  Science 266:1810.
Holldobler, B.  1971.  Communication between ants and their guests. 
	Scientific American (March).  (Reprinted from book by:
	Gould, J. L., and C. G. Gould, Editors.  1989.  Life at the 
	edge:  readings from Scientific American Magazine.  W. H. 
	Freeman and Company, New York.  162pp.)  (This article is on pages 
	111-121).
Page, T. L.  1994.  Time is the essence:  molecular analysis of 
	the biological clock.  Science  263:1570-1572.
Provine, R. R.  1996.  Laughter.  American Scientist  84:38-45.
Schwenk, K.  1994.  Why snakes have forked tongues.  Science 263:
	1573-1577.
Schwenk, K.  1995.  The serpent's tongue.  Natural History 4:48-54.
Seachrist, L.  1994.  Sea turtles master migration with magnetic 
	memories.  Science 264:661-662.
Stanford, C. B.  1995.  Chimpanzee hunting behavior and human 
	evolution.  American Scientist 83:256-261.
Takahashi, J. S., and M. Hoffman.  1995.         .  American 
	Scientist 83:158-165.
Tinbergen, N.  1952.  The curious behavior of the stickleback. 
	Reprinted from Scientific American.
Wasserman, E. A.  1995.  The conceptual abilities of pigeons.  
	American Scientist 83:246-255. 	
Wilson, E. O.  1975.  Slavery in ants.  Scientific American (June). 
 	(Reprinted from book by:  Gould, J. L., and C. G. Gould, 
	Editors.  1989.  Life at the edge:  readings from Scientific 
	Magazine.  W. H. Freeman and Company, New York  162pp.) (This 
	article in on pages 122-128.)
Wright, R.  1994. Our cheating hearts.  Time 144:44-52.

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Animal Observation Assignment:

Observe an animal of your choice for a continuous 1/2 
hour.  Make a chart of times and behaviors (be specific about the 
behaviors you observe).  Every time behavior changes, record it and 
the time.  Then go to the library and/or other references and read 
about what these behaviors mean.  Write a report (in proper 
scientific format- introduction, methods, results, discussion, 
literature cited) on your findings and interpretations;  include 
complete citations of reference(s) used.

Make an ethogram for your animal of choice (make it as 
complete as possible for the 1/2 hour you observe) and  
use it as a table in your results section.

An example of this exercise is located in our class reference files in Hagen 410. 

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Ideas For Animal Behavior Research Projects:	Updated 9 January 2008
Note:
	
Animal use and care guidelines make it much more 
difficult to work on vertebrates than invertebrates.  For projects 
dealing with mammals or birds, we more or less have to design 
something that does not require you to actually touch 
the animals.  
1.	Birds/squirrels at feeders
2.	Food preference test - dominance hierarchy associated with 
	food access
3.	Ants - scent trails
4.	Spiders - web building, prey catching
5.	Bees - test different colors, tastes, sweetness concentrations
	(We can check with NDSU on availability)
6.	Domestic animals - all kinds of stuff!
	(check with instructor - animal use and care guidelines still 
	prevail)
7.	Crayfish - substrate preferences, dominance hierarchies 
	relating to size, sex, who was there first, etc.
8.	Gophers - dig out their burrows and determine how gophers 
	respond to the disturbance;  look at burrow distribution and 
	habitat preference patterns   
9.	Deer - tracks, scats, observations - habitat use, response to 
	human approach, deer season behavior
10.	Response of animals to human presence - with/without blinds, 
	different colored/shaped blinds, different color of human 
	clothing, washing clothes in special substance so whites do 
	not appear brilliant under UV light (deer can see the UV 
	portion of the spectrum)
11.	Experiment comparing different methods of sampling animal 
	behavior, e.g., continuous sampling vs. spot sampling, 
	focal-animal sampling vs. scan-sampling 
12.	Scents:  predator/prey reactions to scents that can be 
	purchased commercially
13.	Fish behavior 
14.	Turtle behavior
******************************************************************
For other ideas, see file of past student projects on reading shelf 
in Room 306.
						Update 9 January 2008
Donna Stockrahm's Personal Library Has References on the Behavior 
of the following topics.  Take note that these are my personal 
books, and as such, you must take good care of them.  They are not 
to be taken out of Room 306 unless you have my special permission.
1.	Wild Birds (Stokes Series I, II, III)
2.	Domestic Dogs (Morris 1986)
3.	Domestic Cats (Morris 1986, 1987)
4.	Domestic Horses (Morris 1988, Waring 1983)
5.	African Mammals (Estes 1991) 
6.	Domestic Animals:  Dogs, Cats, Horses, Pigs, Cattle, Sheep
	(Albro Houpt 1991)

Various Textbooks on Animal Behavior and Behavorial Ecology






**************

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Sparrow (or Bird) Observation Lab	Updated 9 January 2008
1. 	Describe appearance of species.
2.	Is it a mixed-species flock or single-species flock?
3.	What is size of flock?
4.	Are there other flocks nearby or is this flock isolated from 
	conspecifics?  
5.	What is spacing between flocks if other flocks are present?
6.	Do flocks seem to have any interaction with each other?
7.	Can you tell males from females?
	On the basis of what? e.g., color, behaviors?
	How do behaviors differ?  e.g., dominance, display to same 
	sex, display to other sex, response to humans?
8.	Can you tell mature from immature animals?
	Same questions as # 3 above.
9.	How do birds seem to communicate with other birds?
10.	In a flock, all the birds seem to move together when the flock 
	flies from place to place.  Is this true?  
	How do they seem to communicate to the other birds so they 
	function as a group?  
	How important does visual communication seem to be?  How about 
	vocal communication?
12.	Do there seem to be any displacement behaviors?
13.	Do there seem to be any stereotype behaviors?	
14.	Make an ethogram for this species (or as close as you can
	approximate it with the time allotted.)	
15.	Be sure to include: feeding/drinking behaviors, pecking, 
	vigilance, locomotion (flying, hopping, etc.)



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 Animal Behavior Scavenger Hunt		9 January 2008			
Find examples of the following behaviors in both vertebrates 
(non-human) and invertebrates.  For context, include things like:
	
	- Is this a solitary behavior?
	- Are other animals of same species present?
	- If/how other organisms respond to behavior of observed 	 
 	  animal.
	- Was the behavior part of a sequence of behaviors?
	
Behavior		Animal		Description		Context 
Food getting	                                                   
			                                                  	
			                                                  	
			                                                   
			                                                   
Ingesting		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
  			                                                   
   	
Aggression		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
Auditory		                                                   
Communication	                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                  	
		
Non-Auditory	                                                   
Communication	                                                   
(Movments,	                                                   
Orientations,	                                                   
Expressions,etc)                                                  
Grooming		                                                   
(Self, Others)	                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                  	
Dominance		                                                   
Hierarchy		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
												-2-
Locomotion		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
												
Orientation	                                                   
Away or Towards	                                                   
Stimuli		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                  	
		
Habitat		                                                   
Selection		                                                   
Behaviors		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
Parent/Offspring                                                  
Interactions	                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
Social		                                                   
Behaviors		                                                   
			                                                  	
			                                                   
			                                                   
Other 		                                                   
Behaviors		                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
			                                                   
Questions:
1.	Can you tell if organism is male or female?  Older or younger? 
	How - Physical (color, markings, structures) or
	Behavioral (males/females older/younger behave differently)?
2.	Of the above behaviors, which one(s) seem to be more complex 
	and which more simple?
3.	Which behaviors seem to have some element of learning in them?
4.	Which behaviors seem very repetitive and seem to be based more 
	on instinct than on learning?
5.	What did you think was the most interesting behavior?  Why?
6. 	Anything else you want to add?
******************************************************************
Find at least 3 journals that publish mainly or all articles on 
animal behavior.  (Check library, Biology Seminar Room, Computer-
On-Line, etc.)


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